Counter Stool

Collection Project Chandigarh
Year/Period 1965
Dimensions ( cm / in ) H 24.9 63.0 / D 16.8 42.5 / W 16.8 42.5

Product Description

The Counter Stool or Round Stool has a solid teak seat with two metal rings - one at the foot of the stool and a smaller ring supporting the seat. The seat is gently hollowed to make seating comfortable.

The metal rings are made of bright flat steel bars and have been fabricated using the hot metal rolling process that was commonly used in the early to mid 20th century. In this method, a flat bar of steel is shaped into a circle; and a weld is made at the point the two ends meet. The visible but inconspicuous inch wide weld grinding mark in the rings is due to this. The original patina of the raw material (which comes as flat bars) is retained to give the rings a weathered look. The screws used to fix the metal to the wood are also of the type used a few decades ago, although we have upgraded the quality from mild steel to stainless steel.

Product Specification

Standard dimensions

H 24.9 63.0 / D 16.8 42.5 / W 16.8 42.5

Materials Burma Teak (Tectona Grandis) Steel
Product variants N/A
Other information Leg Width - 16.8 42.5 Seat Diameter - 14 35.5
Download technical sheet

Wood Finish Options

We offer this product in Natural Teak or Dark Stain finish. For the Natural Teak, we do not stain the wood; the wood is sanded to smoothness and transparent wood polish and sealer are applied to bring out the natural golden brown colour of teak. For the Dark Stain, a coat of teak stain is applied to give the wood a darker shade. Please note, each batch of teak is unique and actual shade may vary a little from the reference images.

Wood Finish Options - Natural Teak / Dark Stain

Colour swatch of Natural Teak
Natural Teak
Colour swatch of Dark Stain
Dark Stain

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